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KINSEY, Alva Curtis*
(1846-Between 1923/1926)
CUNNINGHAM, Margaret Louisa*
(1856-After 1940)
HOWES, Singleton Zachary*
(Abt 1839-1899)
CLAY, Maria*
(1842-1921)
KINSEY, Cletus Brinton*
(1883-1964)
HOWES, Mabel Jennie*
(1885-1967)
KINSEY, Dorothy Hamilton, Sister
(1904-1980)

 

Family Links

KINSEY, Dorothy Hamilton, Sister

  • Born: 13 Jul 1904, Baltimore, Maryland, United States 22,27,28,114,129
  • Died: 12 Oct 1980 22,130
  • Buried: National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seaton, Emmitsburg, Frederick Co, MD 130

bullet   Other names for Dorothy were KINSEY, Dorothy, Sr.,130 KINSEY, Dorothy 28,114,129 and KINSEY, Dorothy H..27

picture

bullet  Noted events in her life were:



Census, 21 Apr 1910, Baltimore, Maryland, United States. 27
1) Kinsey, Clitus B., head of household, rents his home at 128 Mount Street, age 26, married for 6 years, born MD, parents born MD, tin plate maker
2) Kinsey, Mabel J., wife, age 24, married for 6 years, 3 children, 3 living, born MD, parents born MD
3) Kinsey, Dorothy H., daughter, age 5, born MD, parents born MD
4) Kinsey, Margaret M., daughter, age 3, born MD, parents born MD
5) Kinsey, Hortense E., age 2, born MD, parents born MD.



Census, 10 Jan 1920, Baltimore, Maryland, United States. 28
1) Kinsey, Clitus, head of household, rents his home at 128 North Mount Street, age 36, married, born MD, parents born MD, machinist at railroad
2) Kinsey, Mabel, wife, age 34, married, born MD, parents born MD
3) Kinsey, Dorothy, daughter, age 15, attends school, born MD, parents born MD
4) Kinsey, Margaret, daughter, age 13, attends school, born MD, parents born MD
5) Kinsey, Hortense, daughter, age 11, attends school, born MD, parents born MD
6) Kinsey, Mary J., daughter, age 8, attends school, born MD, parents born MD
7) Kinsey, Ruth, daughter, age 4, born MD, parents born MD
8) Kinsey, Louise, daughter, age 2, born MD, parents born MD
9) Brown, Sarah, sister-in-law, age 48, widow, born MD, parents born MD, seamstress at department store
10) Brown, Marie, niece, age 23, single, born MD, parents born MD, no occupation.

Story, 1922. 22 Became Sister of Charity in 1922.



Census, 2 Apr 1930, Baltimore, Maryland, United States. 114
1) Kinsey, C. D., head of household, rents his home at 248 Payson Street for $45/month, has a radio, age 47, married first at age 21, born MD, parents born MD, machinist at railroad shop
2) Kinsey, Mabel J., wife, age 44, fist married at age 18, born MD, parents born MD, no occupation
3) Kinsey, Dorothy, daughter, age 26, single, born MD, parents born MD, school teacher at parochial school
4) Kinsey, Hortense, daughter, age 22, single, born MD, parents born MD, cashier at theater
5) Kinsey, Mary J., daughter, age 18, born MD, parents born MD, seamstress at hosiery repair
6) Kinsey, Ruth, daughter, age 14, attends school, born MD, parents born MD
7) Kinsey, Louise, daughter, age 12, attends school, born MD, parents born MD
8) Kinsey, Bernice, daughter, age 10, attends school, born MD, parents born MD
9) Kinsey, Alva, daughter [sic], age 7, attends school, born MD, parents born MD
10) Kinsey, Gordon, son, age 3, born MD, parents born MD.

Residence, 1 Apr 1935, Greensboro, North Carolina, United States. 129



Census, 1 May 1940, Pikesville, Baltimore Co, MD. 129
1. Kinsey, Sister Dorothy, head of household, owns her home, valued at $4000, not a farm, age 35, single, completed at least 5 years of college, born MD, lived in Greensboro, NC, on 1 April 1935, worked 50 hours during week of March 24-30, occupation teacher at parish school, wage or salary worker in government work, employed 52 weeks in 1939, received $360 in wages in 1939, received additional income
2. Wheeler, Sister Rosa, assistant, age 53, single, completed at least 5 years of college, born MD, lived in Troy, NY, on 1 April 1935, worked 50 hours during week of March 24-30, occupation teacher at parish school, wage or salary worker in government work, employed 52 weeks in 1939, received $360 in wages in 1939, received no additional income
3. Sebastina, Sister Alphonsa, assistant, age 55, single, completed at least 5 years of college, born SC, lived in Washington, DC, on 1 April 1935, worked 50 hours during week of March 24-30, occupation teacher at parish school, wage or salary worker in government work, employed 52 weeks in 1939, received $360 in wages in 1939, received no additional income
4. Condon, Sister Dominira, assistant, age 49, single, completed at least 5 years of college, born NY, lived in Greensboro, NC, on 1 April 1935, worked 50 hours during week of March 24-30, occupation teacher at parish school, wage or salary worker in government work, employed 52 weeks in 1939, received $360 in wages in 1939, received no additional income
5. Mounie, Sister Elizabeth, assistant, age 44, single, completed at least 5 years of college, born VA, lived in same house on 1 April 1935, worked 50 hours during week of March 24-30, occupation teacher at parish school, wage or salary worker in government work, employed 52 weeks in 1939, received $360 in wages in 1939, received no additional income
6. Doerr, Sister Regina, assistant, age 43, single, completed at least 5 years of college, born PA, lived in Baltimore, MD, on 1 April 1935, worked 50 hours during week of March 24-30, occupation teacher at parish school, wage or salary worker in government work, employed 52 weeks in 1939, received $360 in wages in 1939, received no additional income
7. Rhodes, Sister Juliana, assistant, age 38, single, completed at least 5 years of college, born WV, lived in same house on 1 April 1935, worked 50 hours during week of March 24-30, occupation teacher at parish school, wage or salary worker in government work, employed 52 weeks in 1939, received $360 in wages in 1939, received no additional income
8. Geck, Sister Pauline, assistant, age 35, single, completed at least 5 years of college, born PA, lived in Syracuse, NY, on 1 April 1935, worked 50 hours during week of March 24-30, occupation teacher at parish school, wage or salary worker in government work, employed 52 weeks in 1939, received $360 in wages in 1939, received no additional income.

Occupation: Nun, Sister of Charity.

Story. 22 Confined to wheelchair after leg was amputated due to diabetes.

Story. From a paper called "Sister Dorothy Kinsey", found at home of her niece Mary Margaret Campbell (Raupuk). [Mostly verbatim, but some parts omitted or reworded] Born July 31 1904 to Mabel and Cletus Kinsey in Baltimore MD, just a few doors away from St Martin's School. Died October 12 1980. Her sister Louise recalls that their grandparents looked on her as the "apple of their eye". Dorothy poured out love on her seven sisters for whom she cared so devotedly and became known as their second mother. Since her mother was a somewhat frail person, Dorothy was given much of the responsibility of bringing up her little sisters (her two brothers were born after she entered the Community). She would jokingly remark later that her crooked hip was due to the fast that she used to carry the babies on her hip. Mrs. Kinsey [Dorothy's mother] was a convert who became a truly good Catholic mother and, like Dorothy, she was blessed with a happy disposition and a contagious laugh. She once remarked "I never had to worry about money because I never had any." Mr. Kinsey was a hard-working bokkeeper for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and prided himself on his ability to raise and support such a fine family. Papa Kinsey demanded and enforced prompt obedience and self-discipline. Growing up Dorothy was a true fun-loving child. The three following instances will verify what we mean and were shared by one of her close girl friends of those days. "Dorothy and I loved to slide down the sipral staircase in the Church leading into the boiler room and boys' schoolyard and then get away before we were caught. We also loved to sneak into the Sisters' quarters to get a look at their bedrooms. I can remember, too, how once we took a get-well gift to a schoolmate which was a well-frozen horse biscuit wrapped in lovely gift-wrap paper." Since she was interested in piano, she received lessons at St. Martin's where she also attended school. As there was no piano in the home, Dorothy was allowed to practice at the Sisters' House. No doubt, the seeds of vocation were nurtured at the same time. She loved to recall the Sisters of those days and the many joys of her school days. On September 8, 1922, Dorothy commenced her Postulatum at Mt Hope Retreat in Baltimore, MD. Three months later, December 16, she entered the Seminary. The following August she received the Holy Habit and was sent to her first Mission, Holy Cross School in Lynchburg VA where she taught until 1931. From Lynchburg she moved to Greensboro, NC where she continued as a teacher for the next five years. During the summer of 1937 she was named Sister Servant of St. Charles School, Pikesville, MD. One of Sister Dorothy's nieces has recollections of those days. "As a child, it was an exciting and enjoyable day when we went to visit Aunt Dorothy. I can still remember St. Charles School in Pikesville. The Campbell clan packed a picnic lunch and went off to the 'big city' to see the 'sailboat ladies', all ten of us at that time Mom, Dad and eight 'little darlings' (the Sisters called us that). Sister Dorothy would take us to the chapel (that was the quietest Mom ever saw us). We would say a few prayers for all the sick and deceased who we wanted to remember. We would get a holy card to take home as we left. That was a great gift to me as a child. As a teenager, I realized that a Sister was human and a person like myself. I could talk to Aunt Dorothy as a friend. She knew we had problems as well as anyone else. I also found out that she had hair and it was red like mine, she showed me." One of the pupils of those days, now a Trappist Monk, has shared his memories in the following account. "Sister Dorothy was principal of St. Charles in Pikesville when I entered the eighth grade there in September 1940. Besides being principal, she taught the eighth grade several subjects and my general impression of her was that she was friendly but severe. ... She was often smiling and friendly, but when once she put on her stern countenance, the fear of God was in us all. And yet, I do not remember her ever shouting or administering corporal punishment. ... But it was twenty-five years later that I really got to know her. I was by then a Trappist Monk and a Priest. In 1965 my superiors asked me to go to Kenya to help teach in our monestery at Lumbwa. [before I went, I visited friends in Baltimore] I had heard that Sister Dorothy had had her leg amputated, so I went to see her at Villa St. Michael. We reminised aof the Pikesville days and she admitted to me that she had put on those stern airs as she thought it was required of her. ... When I returned from Kenya [in 1970] I again paid her a visit, but by now she was at Villa St. Michael in Emmitsburg. Several times over the past ten years [I visited her] and at each visit I could see that her arthritis was becoming more and more acute. ... On my return from Nigeria in 1979, I [offered] the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass in her room. From that visit, I knew she did not have long to live." In August 1945 Sister Dorothy was missioned to St. John's School, Baltimore, as Sister Servant and Principal. Because of illness, her next seven or eight missions were of short duration. On the feast of the Assumption 1950, she was installed as Sister Servant of St. John's School, Albany, New York. Her frail health once again was the source of her missioning during the summer of 1952. She returned to St. Charles School, Pikesville, where superiors thought her burden would not be so heavy. In April 1953, she was sent to St. Vincent's Hospital, Jacksonville, Florida for a complete rest. When she was unable to accept a duty a few months later, she was missioned to the other extreme of the Province, Sister's Hospital, Buffalo, New York. [There she supervised the Admitting Office] About one year later, she had an acute attack of rheumatoid arthritis. She was excused from duty ... On her next three missions she continued the duty of office work or receptionist intermingled with rest. She returned to Sister's Hospital in Buffalo in June 1961 at her own request. In the fall of that year a blood clot due to poor circulation lodged in her right leg, which necessitated its amputation above the knee. She was transferred to St Agnes' Hospital, Baltimore, in January 1962. She had been fitted for an artificial limb and did all in her power to use it but was unable to do so because of the pain and crippling consequences of her rheumatoid arthritis. Her hands were becoming more painful and deformed each day. Sister Dorothy was moved to Villa St. Michael [Baltimore] in the summer of 1962. When she was able, she acted as receptionist at the front door, attended the switchboard, and assisted with the clerical work of the office. She also was responsible for the Villa payroll. In October 1968 she requested and was granted a visit to Emmitsburg which lasted for three months. As a result of this visit, she stated that her appetite, which was almost nil, had returned, along with courage, confidence, and interest. Since most of her family lived in or around Baltimore, she received frequent visits from them and was occasionally permitted to visit her family, especially at the time of the annual family reunion. One of her neices [must be Betty Hope] recollects "Aunt Dorothy wasn't allowed to visit us individually in her early days as a Sister. When we had family reunions at my parents' place in Crownsville, Sister Dorothy would come with two other Sisters. She couldn't stay long but she was there to make a complete reunion. She was in her wheelchair the last time she came and my son Thomas Jr (ten years old at the time) was pushing her around the grounds. They came to the top of a hill and he asked the other children if they would like to see the 'flying nun' in person. Aunt Dorothy got a big laugh out of that! My heart was in my mouth; she didn't know our Tommy!" .... Her youngest sister, Louise, who was a hairdresser at the time, recalls a visit: "I remember going to see Sister Dorothy at the Vila with my big toe (which I had broken) in a cast. ' How are you going to stand on your feed and work?' she asked me. I told her that as soon as I could find a shoe that I could cut the front off of, I'll be back in business. I said that I hated to cut up my good shoes. 'Oh, dear child', she said 'I knew I was hanging on to the shoe I don't use anymore for some reason.' " When the Villa moved to Emmitsburg in 1970 [source document is not sure of this date], Sister Dorothy had become much more incapacitated and the pain she endured was increasing daily. She became more helpless, depression came upon her and she experienced a great sense of loneliness. Those who knew her only during her Villa years did not know the whole Sister Dorothy. Towards the end of her life she developed cataracts on her eyes which impaired her sight. Finally, pneumonia developed, and she died early Sunday morning October 12, 1980. One of her best friends remarked that when she saw her laid to rest in the parlor of the Villa, her sorrow was turned to joy because Sister Dorothy's countenance radiated peace and satisfaction. It seemed as though she were saying "At last, I am with God! No more suffering, no more pain -- only eternal happiness in the presence of my God for whom I lived my life."

Residence: Villa Saint Michael, St Josephs Provincial Home, 1979, Emmitsburg, Frederick County, Maryland, United States.




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